Monthly Archives: September 2014

sleep my little babbio

blanket

Sleep my little baby-oh
Sleep until you waken
When you wake you’ll see the world
If I’m not mistaken…

Kiss a lover
Dance a measure,
Find your name
And buried treasure…

Face your life
Its pain,
Its pleasure,
Leave no path untaken.
(from The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman)

I can only just make out the scent of autumn in the air but it’s there, right along with its knitty siren call.  As a belated birthday gift, I’m working on the first of a pair of fingerless wrist warmers. The second project is a baby blanket for an expectant mother.

I muse at the irony of my love of knitting —a skill, along with embroidery, that my seamstress mother declared she had no patience for.  It requires a sort of sustained and mindful, sometimes even meditative, attention.  This contrasts with the impatience that I exhibit when I attempt to work my way through a sewing project.  Clearly our sensibilities around what constitutes patience vary greatly.

wristwarmers

While I knit, I sometimes multitask.  If the project is a simple one which allows my hands to do the work without engaging too much of my attention (a garter stitch or a simple rib pattern, for example), I am able to watch movies while I work on a project.  When I work on more complicated things requiring focus and greater visual contact with the piece and the pattern, I tend to listen to audiobooks.

Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett (together or separately) are favourites, in that regard.  As my son will attest, I will listen to the books repeatedly (enjoying them immensely each and every time), while I work on my various pieces.  The little poem up top is from Neil’s The Graveyard Book, which I adore.  I found a rather aged post that mentioned it was being made into a stop motion film.  That should be pretty fantastic.

on passion (& vintage typewriters)

vintage typewriter

“Ignoring your passion is slow suicide. Never ignore what your heart pumps for. Mold your career around your lifestyle not your lifestyle around your career.”
Anonymous

I saw this post online (if you click the photo up top, it will take you to it – I hope), along with the caption.

I really want one of these old typewriters – one is on my wish list…

But… I’ve come to find that I have made peace with the dichotomy of passion and earning a living not necessarily being one and the same…

One can be passionate about one’s work – its quality, the service it provides to those we are hired to assist, the higher purpose of the organizations for whom we work, the connections we make with inner and outer clients, our sense of usefulness in our roles… those are many things we can be passionate about in relation to earning a living.

I was stuck for so long for much of my adult life fretting about how to turn the things I was passionate about (my writing, my art, my creative pursuits, my volunteering work) into a living, so much so that I lost sight of the passion and also was in a constant state of discontent at being unable to make this shift I so wanted to make yet was incapable of defining.

It turns out that I’m damned good at my “day job” and despite having one (when I’m not unemployed) I can still engage in the things I am passionate about on my own time because they energize me and infuse me with enthusiasm.

I’ve learned that those two parts of my life are not mutually exclusive. Joy (and passion) can be found in all things.